Auto Insurance – What You Need to Know About Buying Auto Insurance For Students

Your heart is pounding, your head pulsating and every fiber of your being is feeling tingly. This is the thrill of your first time behind the wheel. They are the same feelings you will experience when you encounter your first accident. As drivers, teenagers are the most prone to accidents because of their newness to driving on the road. For this reason, auto insurance for students can be very expensive. While hoping for the best while driving, you should prepare for the worst.

As so many young adult drivers die in car accidents, it is now mandatory in many states to obtain what is called a "Graduated Driver License." This license permits young drivers provisioning driving authority for 6 to 12 months. A fully licensed driver has to be, at all times, in the car with them. After the provisional period, written and driving tests are required. Upon passing, they will be issued a license allowing them to drive independently. There will be strings attached, however, that may include a limited amount of passengers and restrictions on the usage of cell phones and driving at night. Do not knock it, because statistics show this system works … the reduced number of teenage accidents have been well documented. Want cheaper rates? Follow the advice below: Be sure your grades are at least a B average, as insurance companies believe students with higher grades are more responsible. Complete a driver's education class and advise your insurance company.

Also, let the insurance company know if you are driving on a limited basis, as you may be entitled to a discount. Example: if you are staying on campus and drive your vehicle only on the weekends or holidays. And here's one last tip that might cost you a few dollars now but could save you from considering loss in the future. Make inquiries in regard to renters insurance. Being young, what kind of assets could you have, right? You might be surprised! In that backpack – do you have an iPod? A cell phone? A laptop? They could all add up to a substantial loss if lost or stolen. So purchase a simple renters insurance policy and do not worry … if something happens – you're covered. It's called "piece of mind guaranteed."

How To Get Cheap Teen Auto Insurance?

For most teenagers, turning sixteen means they have reached the time in their life where they can begin driving. However, before your teenager can set sail on their own, they must first acquire auto insurance. But purchasing auto insurance for a teenager can be quite expensive. Therefore, looking for cheap teen auto insurance can help your teenager get on the road a lot quicker. There are a variety of different things you and your teenager can do to get the best price on car insurance for your young driver.

One of the first things that will assure you get cheap auto insurance is to be sure your teenager has a perfect driving record. It is very important that you instill in your teenager the importance of obeying all traffic laws. Your teenager will need to be sure they avoid all traffic violations and speeding tickets. And although they may not be able to avoid every accident they need to do everything they can to stay accident free. Their reward for keeping a clean driving record will be cheap teen auto insurance.

Academics will also play a part in the amount you pay for teen auto insurance. If your son or daughter is looking to drive, they will want to have good grades. Many insurance companies will provide lower rates for students who have better grades.

Another way you can save a considerable amount of money on auto insurance for your teenager is to choose a higher deductible. Generally speaking, the higher your insurance deductible, the lower your premium payment will be.

If you are looking to get the lowest possible auto insurance you may want to consider purchasing a car with as many safety features as possible. The more safety features the car has, the lower the premium is. Safety features such as airbags will greatly help lower the premium. You will also want to avoid purchasing a car that is considered to be a high hazard. Cars in that class will jack up the price of auto insurance very quickly.

If your teenager has any restrictions on their license they need to be carefully followed. For instance, many states have a curfew for young drivers. Therefore, this needs to be closely followed. Other states may limit the number of passengers a young driver may have in their car.

If you are looking for cheap auto insurance you can consider getting your teenager a stand-alone policy. With this type of policy your teenager will solely be responsible for the insurance. However, there are some restrictions for new drivers, such as only being allowed to drive during the day.

As a parent of a teenager driver, it is appropriate to make your young driver responsible for anything that happens to the car. They may want to consider getting a part time job to help cover the cost of the maintenance of the car as well as the auto insurance. You can do everything in your power to get the lowest price on auto insurance. However, your teenager will also need to do their part.

So, What Is This Thing Called Edumarketing?

We Live in a Society driven by information. Information provides the building blocks upon which knowledge is constructed. Today, knowledge is the real currency of business-the stimulus that drives our economy and thus our livelihoods.

Two of the most revered thinkers of the past 100 years, Peter Drucker and Philip Kotler, were clear in their characterization of the contemporary business environment. That is, we now live in a knowledge society.

Peter Drucker noted this transformation in his book The Post Capitalist Society, exhorting, “That knowledge has become the resource, rather than a resource. Further, “This fact changes-fundamentally-the structure of society.”

According to Kotler “the passage from an Industrial Economy into an Informational Economy is introducing new considerations that question the suitability of conventional marketing thinking in developing today’s and tomorrow’s marketing strategies.”

Why Edumarketing?

The past ten years have seen tremendous tumult in the field of marketing. We live in a media-rich world in which information bombards us from all angles. In his compelling book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, Robert Cialdini states, “You and I exist in an extraordinarily complicated stimulus environment, easily the most rapidly moving and complex that has ever existed on this planet.”

These views suitably describe the world we live in, where information and knowledge are central to our existence. The advent of computers, the Internet, wireless communication, and other technologies are presenting new opportunities for marketing practitioners.

One of the areas is that of partnering with customers, both business-to-business and business-to-consumer, to create a learning experience in which the customer learns-both how to better define their problem and how to best solve this problem.

In this new reality, it’s the customer who, for the most part, runs the show.

Customers are using technology to learn about the company behind the product and services they purchase along with dissecting every element of the product via self-education-and that fundamentally changes everything.

Capturing the customer’s attention is no longer possible by simply putting your message “out there.” An emphasis on knowledge creation calls for bold changes.

What has to change? The way you communicate.

The fast pace of today’s marketplace-whatever your industry-has changed the way customers want to do business. Marketing has become less about pushing messages out to people, and more about empowering them to make informed purchase decisions.

Rather than engaging in a manipulative process, marketing communicators should look to inform and educate potential customers, providing them with insight and information they need to make an intelligent decision. Doing this is the new way of building customer loyalty.

This paper discusses a new method of understanding and influencing the customer through communications that inform and influence. This method is called edumarketing.

Edumarketing is the activity initiated by a company that is designed to influence changes in knowledge, skills, or attitudes of customers-whether individuals, groups, or communities.

Cognitive psychology, and particularly research dealing with how people learn, tells us that people use existing perceptual filters and mental representations when making decisions.

Numerous studies verify that thinking involves three constructive elements-that together drive they way people learn. These elements are cognition, emotion, and the context in which the thinking takes place.

Edumarketing emphasises influencing the path to purchase using education-based marketing that informs, instructs and educates. Weaving together the cognitive, emotional and social components of learning.

Today, your customers are likely to hold you to very high standards when it comes to providing them data and information necessary for them create knowledge and understanding. Ultimately helping them make the best purchase possible.

Education based marketing, edumarketing, provides an opportunity for the marketing communicator to connect with customers in a way centered that delivers high-perceived value. Instead of overwhelming people with a self-inflated message, the marketing communicator presents an educational basis for helping the customer find the proper solution to their idiosyncratic issue. And this changes the way you create and exchange messages about your products and services.

How does it work?

The main task for marketing communicators has become every bit as much that of an educator as it is an informer and entertainer. Certainly a great many consumer products will continue down the path of least resistance-that is, to simply entertain in the hopes of building brand image or manipulating one-time sales.

However, what is quickly becoming a prominent part of the marketer’s tool kit is the use of educational techniques to help build loyalty resulting in sales.

Take for example the ordinary cereal box. Cheerios adorns its box with its “Heart Healthy” educational messages. Cheerios uses the cereal box to educate customers on the issue of cholesterol and, of course, how Cheerios can be a part of reducing cholesterol.

This new approach to marketing relies on educating the customer, and for that different principles of marketing apply. The new marketer must understand principles of learning and for sophisticated products and services-get this…learning theory.

Another example, small industrial detergent maker ChemStation (www.chemstation.com) supplies thousands of products in hundreds of industries. ChemStation sells industrial cleaning chemical to a wide variety of business customers, ranging from car washes to the U.S. Air Force. Whether a customer is washing down a fleet or a factory, a store or a restaurant, ChemStation comes up with the right cleaning solution every time.

ChemStation partners with customers working with them to custom-design solutions to their unique cleaning problems. ChemStation works with each individual customer to concoct a soap formula specially designed for that customer.

This works because many business buyers prefer to buy a packaged solution to a problem from a single seller. ChemStation sells its intellectual capabilities to firms that need solutions.

Another firm that excels in the edumarketing arena is Butterball, a leader in the marketing and selling of turkeys. Customers can visit the Butterball web site (www.butterball.com) for information on cooking and carving a turkey.

Butterball’s web site receives over 500,000 visitors during the Thanksgiving week accessing its timely features and tips. However, the dedication to education is found in the fact that the Butterball help line (1-800-BUTTTERBALL) is staffed by 50 home economists and nutritionists who respond to more than 100,000 questions each November and December.

BMW has capitalized on its edumarketing capabilities. They offer an exiting a training program for young drivers. As a part of its “Ultimate Driving Experience” tour, BMW offers to teach people how to drive their cars-at fast speeds! The offer: “Experienced professional drivers will be on hand to guide you through a variety of exhilarating driving techniques designed to hone your abilities – and make you a safer, more confident driver. ” The benefit: Drivers turned on by their new driving capabilities and ready to engage in a conversation about how to integrate these capabilities into their daily driving habits.

Gone are the days when advertisers could simply tell the world about their new and wonderful product or service. Today’s customers are smart. They have access to information from a wide range of sources-and they use it. Firms must go beyond the simple show-and-tell of yesteryear.

Company claims app can prove you’re a good driver | Transportation

“Good drivers should be rewarded for good driving.”

So said B.C. Attorney General David Eby in July following the release of an EY report that warned of spiking accident claims and soaring Insurance Corp. of British Columbia (ICBC) premiums.

The average B.C. driver will pay an additional $130 this year, thanks to a blended rate increase of 8%.

Young drivers are hit particularly hard because they’re classified as higher-risk drivers and already pay higher premiums.

But what if there were an app that could prove you’re a good driver and improve your driving?

Turns out there is such an app. It’s called usage-based insurance, and it’s now available in B.C. for the optional portion of auto insurance.

Belairdirect, which has offered usage-based insurance (UBI) in other provinces for a couple of years, recently entered the B.C. market.

The company offers a voluntary UBI product called automerit, a smartphone app that monitors driving habits and patterns.

Belairdirect offers an immediate 5% discount on optional insurance for customers who sign up for automerit, and drivers who use the app to improve their driving can get a discount of up to 25%.

And if you turn out to be less than stellar behind the wheel?

“There is no adverse impact on premiums if you’re a really bad driver,” said Henry Blumenthal, Belairdirect’s vice-president of sales and operations.

He added that only good drivers tend to sign up for automerit.

“It’s a voluntary program. People want to show us they’re better drivers.”

The automerit app can detect when a smartphone is moving, and assumes you are driving. It records things like how often – and how hard – you stop, as well as what time of day you travel.

When you stop moving, an alert on the app asks if you were driving instead of, say, travelling by bus or taxi.

If you answer that you were driving, it provides feedback on how well you did.

Generally, people who use it tend to become safer drivers, Blumenthal said, and see their premiums reduced.

In Alberta, Ontario and Quebec, where the company has offered automerit for a couple of years, Blumenthal said more than half of its auto insurance customers opt for automerit.

Usage-based auto insurance has been available in the U.S. for a few years.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the UBI uptake among young drivers is higher than among older drivers, according to a study of UBI use in the U.S. by Charles Weinberg and Miremad Soleymanian from the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business.

Weinberg and Soleymanian were given access to a large U.S. insurance company’s data.

They found that 30% of new applicants for insurance opted for UBI. Adoption rates were more than 48% among drivers aged 18 to 35 compared with 30% for drivers above the age of 35.

They also found that younger drivers were more likely to improve their driving habits than older drivers who used UBI; female drivers were also more likely to improve their driving than male drivers.

Soleymanian said findings from the insurance company data set showed, on average, a 12% discount on insurance premiums.

Soleymanian had first-hand experience with UBI when he lived in Florida, where he got a 29% discount on his auto insurance.

The biggest concern over UBI is privacy. Some drivers might not want their auto insurance company tracking their every move, especially if it means the information could potentially be used against them in the event they are in an accident and the company uses the information to deny a claim.

“You’re clearly giving up your privacy,” Weinberg said. “But at least in the context of UBI, you know you’re giving up your privacy.”

UBI has been more popular in states and provinces where auto insurance is provided by the private sector. In B.C., all drivers must buy their basic auto insurance from ICBC. However, they can buy optional insurance from private insurance companies.

Even on the optional insurance side, Blumenthal said annual savings can range from $100 to $400.

Given the soaring accident rates in B.C., Weinberg said ICBC should consider using UBI in its mandatory coverage because it might improve the driving habits of accident-prone British Columbians. 

nbennett@biv.com

Thornhill College students learn about road safety through harrowing first-hand accounts of accidents

Almost 200 year 14 students at Thornhill Collegehave taken part in one of Northern Ireland’s most engaging road safety initiatives delivered by Autoline Insurance.

The programme involves an educational road safety workshop consisting of videos, statistics and harrowing first-hand accounts of real life incidents from Tracey Doherty, a former PSNI Traffic Branch Officer of over 30 years’ experience.

Students were also advised how new mobile phone road safety apps such as Autoline’s award-winning ‘ChilliDrive’ product can dramatically improve safety standards.

Autoline Insurance Group is visiting schools and colleges across Northern Ireland to deliver its ‘Respect the Road’ safety campaign.  To date over 6,000 new and soon-to-be drivers have benefited from the programme.

Mr Michael McNicholl, Head of Technology & Design and Co-ordinator of Health and Safety at Thornhill Collegesaid;

“As many Year 14 pupils are on the cusp of their motoring adventures, the Respect the Road workshop proved to be a valuable experience for our pupils.

The presentation delivered by Tracy Doherty really engaged our pupils as she detailed her experiences at the scene of road traffic collisions and the consequences on those involved, their families and the emergency services staff.  The experience provided our pupils with plenty to think about and gave them an insight in to how careless driving can permanently impact people’s lives.”

How Young Drivers Can Save Money on Car Insurance



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Whether you’re a full-time student working part-time or a part-time student working full-time or just concentrating on school or work full-time, you’re life probably demands a set of wheels, which as you know is a money-draining piece of machinery. But, there is a financial saving silver lining to car insurance if you’re under 25 years old—check out the following tips designed to help you save on your car insurance premiums.


Learn More: Three must-use tire maintenance tips


When choosing a vehicle to fit your life, make sure it’s equipped with safety features such as anti-theft devices, airbags, and an antilock brake system (ABS); according to The Penny Hoarder Writer Kelly Anne Smith, these high-tech safety features can reduce your insurance rates.

If you are a student, take advantage of this identity and seek out discounts tailored to young drivers who are actively hitting the books.

“Some auto insurance providers offer good-student discounts, which are usually based on your GPA. Insurers have different eligibility thresholds, so call and check with yours,” Smith explains. “You’re in school and want to do well anyways — why not save money for it?”

Another discount you should look into, according to Smith, is one associated with completing a safe-driver course.


Learn More: Five reasons to buy the Hybrid Kia Optima


And although saving money any way you can is important to your financial bottom line, don’t let the thought of saving money outweigh solid judgment.

“Auto insurance can be a budget breaker for young drivers, but don’t let the high price stop you from getting the coverage you need,” Smith writes. “You may want to go with only the minimum coverage your state requires, but this isn’t always a good way to cut costs. If you were to get into a serious accident, you might not have enough coverage to pay for all the damage, which may force you to pay out of your own pocket.”

Car insurance is expensive, but it’s an essential expense if you want to drive—with these tips you can make your payments a little lighter.

News Source: The Penny Hoarder

War on uninsured cars: Police post photos of cars seized – Wisbech News

PUBLISHED: 19:01 22 October 2017 | UPDATED: 19:01 22 October 2017

Despite posting photos of seized cars, police in Fenland are still racking up considerable numbers f vehicles removed from the road for being uninsured. PHOTOS: Fen Cops

Despite posting photos of seized cars, police in Fenland are still racking up considerable numbers f vehicles removed from the road for being uninsured. PHOTOS: Fen Cops

Archant

Police in Wisbech seized their latest vehicle for being on the road with no insurance.

It follows a month in which they’ve posted photos of numerous other cars being taken off the road for the same offence.

On Friday night a silver Mercedes failed to stop twice for Fenland policing units in Wisbech.

A spokesman said: “The vehicle was lost but officers found the vehicle parked up on Kenlan Road.

“The vehicle was seized under section 165 of the Road Traffic Act for no insurance.

“The vehicle was recovered and inquiries are on going.”

On Twitter Fen Cops assured the owner “don’t worry we’ll look after the car”.

The maximum fine that can currently be levied if you’re caught driving without insurance is £5,000 and the minimum fine has just gone up to £300, from £200.

However insurance provider Policy Expert believes that for some the fines are worth the risk

Their spokesman said: “Unfortunately, the average fine for those driving without a licence was revealed by the AA last year to be only £299, making the risk worthwhile in the eyes of those who don’t mind breaking the law.”

Policy Expert says that driving without insurance is illegal and “some would say, immoral. But the threats of driving bans, fines and penalty points don’t seem to be enough to deter the thousands caught every year from doing so.

“Once you realise that the culprits are often young men on low incomes, who insurers see as a high risk and charge a fortune for cover, it perhaps gives you an indication as to one of the main reasons they do.”

The company says young drivers can pay a lot more for cover than more experienced motorists. Anyone who’s just past the driving test, and is in their late teens or early 20’s, might pay anywhere between £1,000 and £2,000 a year for car insurance.

Policy Experts says that such is the problem that one in 25 motorists in the UK is driving around uninsured, according to figures from the road safety charity Brake. And the chances of recovering compensation if you’re involved in an accident with an uninsured driver are very low.

The police have the power to impound any uninsured vehicle. If they do so, you’ll find they’ll only give it back once you’ve paid any fine and can prove you’ve bought the correct cover for your car.

They can even destroy the vehicle after a certainly amount of time has lapsed if you do not reclaim it.

Distracted drivers cause havoc on WA roads

MORE than just a danger to life and limb, distracted drivers are likely proving disastrous for family budgets across the country.

With smartphones now ubiquitous, almost as common is the sight of their owners scrolling through Facebook feeds or replying to text messages behind the wheel.

Inattentive driving resulted in 26 fatalities on WA roads last year, double the previous five-year average.

According to Road Safety Commission research, 57 per cent of WA drivers admit to texting while driving.

RSC acting commissioner Iain Cameron said mobile phones were a relatively recent challenge.

“People’s risk appreciation is quite low and they don’t believe it will happen to them,” he said.

“About 70 per cent of all of our serious crashes are somebody momentarily making a mistake, picking up the mobile phone or whatever.

“They’re not deliberately engaging in high-risk behaviour such as speeding or drink-driving.”

In an illustration of how widespread the bad mobile phone habits have become, The Sunday Times this week captured numerous motorists at traffic hotspots across the city who were using their phones.

While drivers seldom disclose being distracted by their phone when lodging a claim, Canstar group executive for financial services Steve Mickenbecker said he had little doubt the bad habit was driving up car insurance premiums.

According to the financial comparison site, WA premiums jumped between 5 and 19.5 per cent last week — with families with young drivers and 30 to 49-year-olds stung hardest.

“While the data isn’t great on the number of accidents where distracted driving is a causal factor, all State governments have brought in fines and launched huge educational programs to address the issue,” he said.

“That doesn’t happen if it wasn’t causing serious loss to property and to life.”

Both Mr Mickenbecker and an RAC spokeswoman said insurers did not keep records on the number of claims they received relating to distracted driving.

“When there is a fatality there is a full-on investigation and court orders to check phone records to establish if the driver was distracted, but that doesn’t happen in a regular bread-and-butter prang with some panels broken,” the Canstar executive said.

“With no loss of life police rarely get involved and so statistics don’t capture the size of the problem.”

The WA Insurance Commission, which deals only with motor injury insurance, reported a decrease in the number of claims to cover medical bills over the past decade. Commission secretary Kane Blackman said the high number of insured vehicles in the State (2.9 million including caravans and trailers) also helped apply downward pressure to compulsory motor injury insurance premiums.

That would suggest an increase in the number of less serious crashes is fuelling the jump in private insurance premiums.

Mr Mickenbecker pointed to the number of teens and 30-somethings walking around while texting.

“Hopefully when they get behind the wheel they are not quite as prolific but frankly I think we have a whole generation of people who find it extremely difficult not to look at their phone when it goes off,” he said.

could an in-car ‘digital spy’ tell you when it’s time to give up?

Telematic devices – which track how, where and when a vehicle is driven – are increasingly being installed in older drivers’ cars as a way to cut insurance premiums and, more controversially, to detect any deterioration in their driving skills.

The so-called “black box” technology has long been used by young drivers to cut their otherwise sky-high premiums. The principle is that when they agree to be tracked, drivers tend to take more care.

Now the practice is catching on at the other end of drivers’ lifetimes. Older drivers face the steepest increases when they renew their insurance, with premiums currently jumping by an average of 17pc per year for over-50s, compared with 11pc for under-25s.

A few insurers already offer telematics-linked policies to the elderly, including Admiral, Insure the Box and the RAC. And the trend is growing.

Saga, Britain’s largest insurer that specialises in older people, is the latest to consider a move into telematics-based pricing, it told Telegraph Money.

While black boxes could be money-savers, they offer another, more controversial function – that of allowing others to monitor an ageing driver’s competence behind the wheel.

Technology start-up Etouch Solutions develops low-cost telematics boxes that individuals can install themselves. This allows the driver, and anyone he or she permits, the ability to monitor and analyse driving performance via an app.

One possible application would be for family members to track elderly relatives’ driving in order to check they are still safe.

But Mark Ellis, the firm’s founder, insisted that it was not about telling older drivers when to stop.

“This is all about keeping older drivers on the road for longer,” he said. “The earlier you spot that someone is driving erratically, the more you can do about it.

When older drivers have these catastrophic accidents, very often they will already have had a few bumps – but these will not have been acted upon. With telematics, we know about that and they can adapt their driving. A lot of older people have said they drive better just knowing the device is in the car.”

Caught red-handed risking death: Distracted drivers cause havoc on WA roads

MORE than just a danger to life and limb, distracted drivers are likely proving disastrous for family budgets across the country.

With smartphones now ubiquitous, almost as common is the sight of their owners scrolling through Facebook feeds or replying to text messages behind the wheel.

Inattentive driving resulted in 26 fatalities on WA roads last year, double the previous five-year average.

According to Road Safety Commission research, 57 per cent of WA drivers admit to texting while driving.

RSC acting commissioner Iain Cameron said mobile phones were a relatively recent challenge.

“People’s risk appreciation is quite low and they don’t believe it will happen to them,” he said.

“About 70 per cent of all of our serious crashes are somebody momentarily making a mistake, picking up the mobile phone or whatever.

“They’re not deliberately engaging in high-risk behaviour such as speeding or drink-driving.”

Road rage women fight

In an illustration of how widespread the bad mobile phone habits have become, The Sunday Times this week captured numerous motorists at traffic hotspots across the city who were using their phones.

While drivers seldom disclose being distracted by their phone when lodging a claim, Canstar group executive for financial services Steve Mickenbecker said he had little doubt the bad habit was driving up car insurance premiums.

According to the financial comparison site, WA premiums jumped between 5 and 19.5 per cent last week — with families with young drivers and 30 to 49-year-olds stung hardest.

“While the data isn’t great on the number of accidents where distracted driving is a causal factor, all State governments have brought in fines and launched huge educational programs to address the issue,” he said.

“That doesn’t happen if it wasn’t causing serious loss to property and to life.”

media_cameraA driver using their phone on the road.

Both Mr Mickenbecker and an RAC spokeswoman said insurers did not keep records on the number of claims they received relating to distracted driving.

“When there is a fatality there is a full-on investigation and court orders to check phone records to establish if the driver was distracted, but that doesn’t happen in a regular bread-and-butter prang with some panels broken,” the Canstar executive said.

“With no loss of life police rarely get involved and so statistics don’t capture the size of the problem.”

The WA Insurance Commission, which deals only with motor injury insurance, reported a decrease in the number of claims to cover medical bills over the past decade. Commission secretary Kane Blackman said the high number of insured vehicles in the State (2.9 million including caravans and trailers) also helped apply downward pressure to compulsory motor injury insurance premiums.

That would suggest an increase in the number of less serious crashes is fuelling the jump in private insurance premiums.

Mr Mickenbecker pointed to the number of teens and 30-somethings walking around while texting.

“Hopefully when they get behind the wheel they are not quite as prolific but frankly I think we have a whole generation of people who find it extremely difficult not to look at their phone when it goes off,” he said.