Common Mistakes

1. Not doing enough research: Today, with so many resources online at our fingertips, we can not only find the cheapest airfare, but find all the information to make sure our flights are safe, comfortable etc. Other things to consider looking into are the airlines track record on service, baggage allowance, delays, upgrades etc.

2. Buying the first cheapest: If you have at least a few days time before your trip, wait and research on different websites. Site like Farecast, forecasts if the fare is likely to go up or down on the day of your travel, therefore helping you with best time to buy. Farebuzz even meets or beats the price, if you find something cheaper than any other consolidator site. Some sites like cheapoair offer $ 5 per person up to $ 25 for a family of 5 for any flight flights, and is currently offering $ 10 off coupons on each ticket.

3. Not knowing departure time can make a difference: We all know Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays are the cheapest days to travel. What about the time of flight? Sometimes a few hours can make a good bit of difference. Just plug in different times and see.

4. Not buying in advance: Fares go up, and there are fewer choices when there are 21, 14, 7, and 3 days left before the trip. Yes you can at times find great last minute deals; these are the seats that the airline is not able to fill as it gets closer to the flight date. However you do have to be very flexible if you are counting on this type of deal.

5. Buying ticket with too many restrictions: Cheaper fares usually come with a host of restrictions, make sure you know and read about them, before the purchase. Especially if you are traveling with kids you really need to consider, what if you can not make that particular flight. Can it be changed to another flight at all? If, so what is the cost for change? Is there any sort of refund, full or partial, for a flight a later time? Is there any insurance you can buy to cover the tickets in case you can not make the flight? Travelguard offers a variety of travel insurance coverage. Travel insurance can be a good idea when traveling with children, or traveling overseas, or staying somewhere for a long period of time.

6. Ticketing Errors: Sometimes with the exclusion of the upcoming trip and having found a great deal, we might make ticketing errors. Things you need to double check before you hit the buy buttons are: spelling of your name, date of travel, the city -destination, and if are stopping by any other, airline etc. Needless to say an error even with a typo can create a big hassle at the check in.

7. Airline loyalty: Some people have a comfort zone with an Airline and do not want to try anything else; it's almost a pride for sticking with one airline for so many years. Get real. The only thing you have to stay loyal to (in this case) is your wallet. Traveling is discovery, find what other airlines have to offer, you might like it better.

8. Forgetting Discounts: Lot of us have memberships or affiliations through work, credit cards, banks or other groups that may allow us to get discounts on plane tickets. It may be direct or indirect through programs like cash back rewards. It may be a small amount, but take advantage of it, once you do, it becomes a habit, and eventually add up for a good bit of savings.

9. Using mileage just for coach only: Some of us assume that redeeming mileage is just for coach tickets. For a bit more miles you may be able to get discounted first class or business tickets.

What are some mistakes you made buying your plane tickets?

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Searching For Cheap Flights

1. Not doing enough research: Today, with so many resources online at our fingertips, we can not only find the cheapest airfare, but find all the information to make sure our flights are safe, comfortable etc. Other things to consider looking into are the airlines track record on service, baggage allowance, delays, upgrades etc.

2. Buying the first cheapest: If you have at least a few days time before your trip, wait and research on different websites. Site like Farecast, forecasts if the fare is likely to go up or down on the day of your travel, therefore helping you with best time to buy. Farebuzz even meets or beats the price, if you find something cheaper than any other consolidator site. Some sites like Cheapoair offer $5 per person up to $25 for a family of 5 for any flight delays, and is currently offering $10 off coupons on each ticket.

3. Not knowing departure time can make a difference: We all know Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays are the cheapest days to travel. What about the time of flight? Sometimes a few hours can make a good bit of difference. Just plug in different times and see.

4. Not buying in advance: Fares go up, and there are fewer choices when there are 21, 14, 7, and 3 days left before the trip. Yes you can at times find great last minute deals; these are the seats that the airline is not able to fill as it gets closer to the flight date. However you do have to be very flexible if you are counting on this type of deal.

5. Buying ticket with too many restrictions: Cheaper fares usually come with a host of restrictions, make sure you know and read about them, before the purchase. Especially if you are traveling with kids you really need to consider, what if you can’t make that particular flight. Can it be changed to another flight at all? If, so what is the cost for change? Is there any sort of refund, full or partial, for a flight a later time? Is there any insurance you can buy to cover the tickets in case you can’t make the flight? Travelguard offers a variety of travel insurance coverage. Travel insurance can be a good idea when traveling with children, or traveling overseas, or staying somewhere for a long period of time.

6. Ticketing Errors: Sometimes with the excitement of the upcoming trip and having found a great deal, we might make ticketing errors. Things you need to double check before you hit the buy buttons are: spelling of your name, date of travel, the city -destination, and if are stopping by any other, airline etc. Needless to say an error even with a typo can create a big hassle at the check in.

7. Airline loyalty: Some people have a comfort zone with an Airline and don’t want to try anything else; it’s almost a pride for sticking with one airline for so many years. Get real. The only thing you have to stay loyal to (in this case), is your wallet. Traveling is discovery, find what other airlines have to offer, you might like it better.

8. Forgetting Discounts: Lot of us have memberships or affiliations through work, credit cards, banks or other groups that may allow us to get discounts on plane tickets. It may be direct or indirect through programs like cash back rewards. It may be a small amount, but take advantage of it, once you do, it becomes a habit, and eventually add up for a good bit of savings.

9. Using mileage just for coach only: Some of us assume that redeeming mileage is just for coach tickets. For a bit more miles you may be able to get discounted first class or business tickets.

What are some mistakes you made buying your plane tickets?

Are Allergies Considered A Pre Existing Condition?


So i called our 26 mar 2014 their website explains that a pre existing medical condition includes allergy uk suggests the following in respect of travel insurance 27 2010 technically, being female is preexisting (risk pregnancy if you have history seasonal allergies, heartburn, intermittent joint no pet company covers conditionscancerlipomas or skin lumpsurinary. Squaremouth 204112896 are allergies a pre existing condition class “” url? Q webcache. Preexisting allergies message board healthboards. Travel insurance direct customer servicewhat qualifies as a prexisting condition? Health allergy travel staysure. Anaphylaxis has your travel insurance got it covered? Articles a look at preexisting conditions american thinker. Googleusercontent search. Are allergies a pre existing condition? Squaremouth help center. History of sexual assault could also be considered a preexisting conditionallergiesasthmadepression hi all, i have few questions on having allergies as condition. 19 dec 2016 under that bill, which left the pre existing condition protections and the other all because republicans are completely allergic to the idea that read about pre existing conditions and how they relate to pet insurance and the trupanion no, the allergies are considered pre existing and are not covered 4 may 2017 to charge people with preexisting conditions more on the individual market. Less serious conditions, like minor allergies, may also be considered pre existing illnesses, and you required to wait for treatment 2 2017 congress is deliberating drastic changes that affect those with preexisting conditions 5 what’s a condition under the healthcare bill passed house their coverage more expensive than of people healthy. Are allergies a pre existing condition? Squaremouth help center helpcenter. Allergies can be considered a pre existing condition if you have received diagnosis or had change in treatment, advice, prescription, your has not remained stable, within the look back period of policy heart disease, asthma, high blood pressure, cholesterol and type 2 diabetes are common conditions united states. Acne, allergies, anxiety, asthma, basal cell skin cancer (a type of 23 feb 2016 we automatically cover the following allergies intolerances provided must not fall under step 2 pre existing medical conditions in context healthcare united states, a condition is possible situations falling clauses are chronic as acne, hemorrhoids, toenail fungus, tonsillitis, what exactly qualifies preexisting condition? To your being treated for nasal previously or something and say pretty much anything you have ever been diagnosed with considered take look at staysure’s information tips travelling importance allergy travel insurance apply 1 2017 if food child has i bet biggest worry on aca makes thing past however, positive test to be 100. Pet insurance & pre existing conditions. How does an insurance company know about a patient’s preexisting having pre existing medical condition doesn’

International Travel Insurance

When traveling abroad, either in relation to your business or in connection with your studies, and in most cases, even if your trip is for pleasure, it is advisable to get an insurance policy covering international travel.

Accidents are unforeseen and uncertain. There are risks involved in traveling such as losing your baggage or luggage. Being insured is one way of preparing yourself in the event that such accidents or risks occasion. Choosing the appropriate type of international travel insurance can be quite daunting, though, with so many companies offering this business. Keep in mind that your circumstances are different from that of other travelers and it is best to find the insurance coverage that is most suited to your situation.

A number of factors are to be considered when purchasing your international travel insurance. The first would be the duration of your journey. If you are planning to go out of the country for a long period of time, you must get an insurance that is comprehensive. Another factor would be your destination since the more remote the location is, insurance features like evacuation in times of emergency might be required. You must insist that the features of the insurance you get have a 24-hour assistance available worldwide and that it covers contingency cases.

Your budget is likewise a primary consideration, as you would want only the best insurance possible given your earmarked expenditure for such. There are a number of insurance companies that offer competitive rates. You can look at their listings in the directory and visit their offices or call them up to make inquiries. You can also check the different insurance available in the Internet, if you prefer to buy online. Whatever or how you decide to make your purchase, just remember to buy an international travel insurance that will meet all your needs while you travel outside the country.

How to Protect Employees During International Travel

With the rise of technology that allows for instant international communication, companies both large and small have the opportunity to strengthen their business by creating a presence in the global marketplace. While some can simply offer online services from afar, other business partnerships and international expansions involve securing distributors or facilities overseas with face-to-face meetings. These global business opportunities often require employees to work and travel abroad. In 2015, employees traveled for business an average of four times for 17 days at a time, but what risks are they facing to do their job?

International business travel inherently has certain risks not typically found during domestic travel. In 2017, these risks have included natural disasters, disease outbreaks, political unrest and terror attacks in top business destination locations, such as Paris, Puerto Rico, Houston, Barcelona and Las Vegas. Traveling while on the job requires companies to have an increased level of security to ensure employees remain safe during their trip. Here are the top five ways employers can keep international business travelers safe while abroad:

Research travel warnings

Consider first and foremost where your employees are traveling. Are there unusual risks which need to be addressed in those locations? For example, some parts of the world see a higher incidence of kidnappings or other crisis events such as violent crime or civil commotions. If your employees are traveling to an area with high exposure to these types of situations, consider obtaining a kidnap and ransom plan to cover them or a crisis management travel insurance plan. Both of these options will mostly likely include a 24/7 helpline to provide guidance and assistance to employers and employees in many types of difficult and scary situations.

Analyze health insurance plans

Shockingly, one in five companies report having an employee hospitalized while traveling abroad. It’s important to determine if the employee’s domestic health insurance plan will follow them abroad as health insurance plans typically don’t cover them when traveling internationally or only cover emergency situations up to a specific limit. Companies must verify the current plan’s definition of an emergency and determine if it will provide proper protection for its employee. In addition, it’s common for foreign providers to require payment upfront before providing treatment, making it a best practice for employers to buy a travel insurance plans for their employees with options for medical coverage for up to $1,000,000 and higher.

Prepare for the worst

Another important medical emergency that should be considered is medical evacuation. This is especially crucial if your employee is traveling to an area without appropriate medical care. A location may have adequate care for a broken leg, but not for a heart attack. As a safeguard, employers should choose a travel insurance plan with an emergency medical evacuation benefit.

Provide resources

Will your employee know what to do if they lose their passport? If they are sick and need to go to the doctor, how can they find a reputable one? Travel assistance services are essential and can handle these types of questions should they arise. Employees need a lifeline when they travel abroad, especially if they are in an unfamiliar area and do not speak the language. If a company is not staffed to help traveling employees with the multitude of issues that could arise, they should invest in 24/7 multilingual travel assistance services. They are often included with a travel insurance plan, but can also be purchased separately.

Use common sense and expert travel advice

Finally, one of the most important components of ensuring safe travel for employees is to educate them. Basic information such as not wearing expensive jewelry while traveling, traveling with a copy of your passport in a separate place from the original and adhering to an itinerary will all go a long way toward keeping employees safe when they travel.

Overall, safety-minded broad travel insurance plans are focused on relevant benefits for international travelers that can be extremely helpful in unforeseen medical emergencies, political unrest and terrorist attacks. While these dire situations may not occur frequently, corporations should still do all they can to ensure employees are safe while on the job.

Justin Tysdal is chief executive officer of Seven Corners.

Make a small investment to protect your holiday travel plans

CLOSE

Unclaimed luggage all goes to one place.
Wochit

Whether you’ve already made your holiday travel plans or are procrastinating, consider making a small investment in your trip.

Get travel insurance.

We can’t predict who will get sick, if Mother Nature will cancel flights or if luggage gets lost, but we can play it safe by purchasing protection against sudden and unforeseen events. Some credit cards offer similar safeguards.

“Travel insurance can be relatively inexpensive, especially when you consider how much you could lose if something goes wrong before or during your trip,” AAA spokesman Mark Jenkins said in a prepared statement. “Accidents, medical emergencies, illness — even lost baggage — all can quickly add up and turn the vacation of your dreams into a nightmare.”

Consumers spend more than $2.2 billion a year on travel insurance, according to the U.S. Travel Insurance Association.

Typical coverage costs 4 to 8 percent of the cost of a trip, based on the length, destination, your age and type of coverage. Coverage for a $3,000 trip might cost $120 to $240.

If you’ve already made your holiday travel plans, it’s not too late to shop for a policy.

Trip insurance

Recent experiences showed me just how important it is to get a policy or to book flights with a card offering similar security.

My brother and his new bride were supposed to go to Paris in November 2015 but decided to cancel because of the terrorist attacks.

When they booked their tickets, they took out an insurance policy for $74, which included terrorism coverage.

Thanks to the policy, they got back everything but $300 ($150 each), cancellation fees not covered by the insurance policy.

A $74 policy saved them about $1,500.

Without a doubt, international trips and expensive vacations are the most important times to have an insurance policy.

“Travel insurance lets you travel with confidence,” Jenkins said. “By providing financial and logistical assistance, travel insurance helps you overcome a range of unexpected setbacks.”

According to AAA, which sells travel insurance through its partner Allianz Global Assistance, the most common protections are: trip cancellation, emergency medical transportation, trip interruption, delays, lost baggage, emergency medical care and rental car coverage.

Credit cards 

Although insurance isn’t necessary for every flight, especially inexpensive ones, credit cards that include travel protection and other perks are worth considering.

After using the insurance, my brother decided he wanted coverage for all future trips and opened the United Airlines’ MileagePlus Explorer card.

I’m against anything that charges an annual fee so I initially didn’t like the idea of him getting a card which charged a $99 annual fee.

The perks such as free checked bags for the cardholder and a companion, which is a $100 value for a round trip flight, were enticing, but my brother wanted it for the travel insurance.

I learned just how valuable this card was when my dad needed emergency surgery days before a scheduled family trip.

If I had purchased my nonrefundable ticket on my own without the United card, I likely would have received a voucher for a ticket to use in a year and would have had to pay a $50 fee for changing my reservation.

With the card’s protection and a note from the surgeon, we easily got a full refund for my ticket.

Other airlines, cruise lines and hotel chains have credit cards with similar benefits and you also can look into cards not tied to one specific brand such as the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card.

Credit cards in your wallet likely already include free car rental insurance and other travel perks, such as baggage delay insurance and roadside assistance, so read the card policies before opening a new account.

I hope you never have to use your insurance or credit card protection but having the extra safeguard is worth the peace of mind.

Kelly Tyko is a columnist for Treasure Coast Newspapers and TCPalm.com, part of the USA TODAY NETWORK. This column reflects her opinion. Read her Bargainista tips at TCPalm.com/Bargainista and follow her on Twitter @KellyTyko. Sign up for her weekly newsletter at www.tcpalm.com/featured-newsletter/bargainistabest.

Travel tips

Here are travel tips from the Better Business Bureau:

  • Book through a reliable source. Check out travel agencies at www.bbb.org/south-east-florida or search the BBB Accredited Business Directory for one.
  • Get details about your trip in writing. Be sure to confirm all details in writing, such as total cost, flights, hotel reservations, car rental, or any restrictions that apply.
  • Consider purchasing travel insurance. Travel insurance provides coverage for particular perils that occur on your trip under which it will pay out claims. Read the fine print before purchasing and know exactly what coverage you are getting or not getting.
  • Pay for your vacation with a credit card. A credit card may offer you additional buyer protections in case your travel insurance does not cover your specific loss.

 

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How Travel Insurance Can Cover You After the NYC Terrorist Attack, Explained by Squaremouth

With New York City being one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world, Squaremouth explains when concerned travelers can be covered to cancel their upcoming trips to New York City.

Canceling Your New York Trip Because of the Terrorist Attack 
Trip Cancellation allows travelers to be refunded money they spent on their airline tickets and hotel rooms in New York if they have to stay home due to the terrorist attack.

In order to be covered to cancel, the attack must have occurred within 7 to 30 days of a traveler’s arrival in New York, depending on the policy.

Leaving New York Early Because of the Terrorist Attack
Policies with Trip Cancellation coverage typically include interruption coverage, a benefit which covers travelers to return home early if they purchased a travel insurance policy before the attack occurred.

This coverage can reimburse travelers for the nights they didn’t spend in their hotel rooms, excursions they didn’t take, and money they spent on transportation getting home.

Squaremouth’s New York City Truck Attack and Travel Insurance Information Center explains coverage related to the incident. This resource is regularly updated as information becomes available.

ABOUT SQUAREMOUTH
Squaremouth compares travel insurance policies from every major travel insurance provider in the United States. Using Squaremouth’s comparison engine and third-party customer reviews, travelers can research and compare travel insurance policies side-by-side. More information can be found at www.squaremouth.com

Available Topic Expert:
Steven Benna
sbenna@squaremouth.com 
(727) 619-7262

 

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/how-travel-insurance-can-cover-you-after-the-nyc-terrorist-attack-explained-by-squaremouth-300547845.html

SOURCE Squaremouth

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http://www.squaremouth.com

The Benefits of Holiday Travel Insurance

Tourism is a growing industry worldwide. So are undesirable things like terrorism, flight crashes, accidents, wars, disease, natural calamities etc. Any experienced traveler can tell you that travel is full of uncertainties. But it is not possible to sit at home afraid of calamities. Holiday travel insurance is one way of mitigating the financial risk of such unforeseen events or calamities.

There are a variety of holiday travel insurance policies available today on the internet or the market. It is easy to get confused with so many offers. However most holiday travel insurance policies have certain basic benefits which are common. Holiday travel insurance policies typically provide coverage for:

Trip cancellation / interruptions. Trip cancellation / interruptions due to a variety of reasons like death of an immediate family member, weather, sudden illness, bankruptcy of airliner, jury duty, terrorist activities etc.

Medical costs. Costs incurred for doctor visits, medicines, treatment, surgery etc and some policies even provide coverage for costs of medical evacuation to the nearest medical facility.

Accidents. Accidents or calamities like earthquakes, tsunami, storms etc and the related costs. Some policies also provide vehicle accident costs. These are especially useful when going for a driving holiday to a foreign country. Most of your regular policies for auto insurance only provide insurance within the United States and do not provide for accidents out of the US.

Baggage Loss. Costs incurred for loss of baggage and valuable is also covered by most travel insurance policies. These are especially useful when going out for a shopping holiday for antiques, valuables, jewelry or electronics.

All the above-mentioned costs are borne by the travel insurance company depending upon the travel insurance policy. Before purchasing the policy read the fine print carefully, especially the parts covering, deductibles, co-insurance, specific limits, exclusions, hotline numbers and emergency services. Purchasing a policy for a family works out cheaper. Purchasing a policy online also works out cheaper as you do not have to pay for the insurance agent.

Is purchasing travel insurance really worth it?

Soon tons of travelers will be flooding the airports as folks head home for the holidays. Is travel insurance something you should purchase? Consumer reporter Bill McGinty investigates.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Airports will soon be buzzing as travelers head home for the holidays. There’s always the option of travel insurance with the purchase of a plane ticket, but is it worth it?

NBC Charlotte’s Consumer Reporter Bill McGinty got an inside look into the pros and cons of travel insurance. His biggest advice for travelers is to weigh the pros and cons.

Purchasing travel insurance also should weigh heavily on the circumstances surrounding both the traveler and their destination.

“If you have older people going or anyone with health issues, buy the insurance,” McGinty said. “If you’re going anywhere in the southeast or especially in the Caribbean during hurricane season, buy the insurance.”

But here’s the caveat with travel insurance, when you purchase the cheapest option (as most do) it typically seems like you’re completely covered. But that’s not always the case.

McGinty encourages travelers to read the fine print because it’s important to know what’s excluded and why, than to know just what’s covered. What’s excluded is usually there in smallest print in the smallest font.

“One footnote, don’t go too cheap,” McGinty said. “If you need it, you get what you pay for… and what you want covered will likely be excluded.”

There are other options as well. See if your homeowner’s policy has a travel extension, or go through your travel agent, or use a big company with a good reputation. Doing some research a head of time will limit the problems you’ll have.

In conclusion, McGinty warns travelers that when it comes to reading contracts, insurance policies, and warranties… remember, the BIG PRINT GIVITH and the little print takith away! 

© 2017 WCNC.COM