Veterinarians have no obligation to provide free care



Everett Washington high school senior “Shelly” has a real issue with veterinarians. Her email and tone of voice during our telephone chat Sept. 15 revealed a young lady furious with the vets who refused to provide free emergency treatment to her family’s Chihuahua.

Denied at five ER hospitals

“Last night our Chihuahua passed away after being denied care at five ER hospitals in Snohomish County, Washington. He was having seizures, but they all refused to stabilize him, even a pet hospital that had treated the dog in the past insisted on money first. They wanted proof of insurance and/or cash before even looking at him.

“The fact that our dog died due to this is so cruel! There are many laws dealing with harming animals, but I see nothing when it comes to emergency situations when an animal’s life is on the line,” she wrote.

“I want to confront these ER clinics and make it so that no one has to experience running from hospital to hospital, continually being refused until the animal dies in their arms.

“It is inhumane to the animals and heartless for pet owners who should have the right to obtain treatment for sick or injured pets from veterinary clinics, especially pets in emergency situations, without worrying about payment.”

We read Shelly’s email to Stephanie Bell, Senior Director of Cruelty Casework at Norfolk, Virginia-based PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

Bell understands how the articulate high school student would be so upset at being refused by these veterinary hospitals, observing, “Many pet owners do not realize that a veterinary hospital or clinic is a business which, unlike human hospitals, is not subsidized by the government.

“A human hospital ER cannot turn someone away, while an animal hospital is a private business and can. They are not in a position of offering free services, just as a restaurant—which is a private business—is under no legal obligation to feed the homeless.”

Consider veterinary costs

We asked Bell, “What, in your experience, is the one thing that pet owners fail to consider when acquiring a little doggy or kitty for the family?”

“It’s the predictable cost of pet ownership,” she replied.

And just how much? Well, hang on to your leash for the answer:

“Nationally, the estimated annual cost of owning a dog ranges from a thousand dollars for a small dog to $1,500 for a large dog, not including emergencies, such as a dog who ingests a chicken bone or fractures a leg. Basic costs include: feeding, grooming, flea control, possible increased rent charges,” she points out.

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What if your neighbor’s dog has a litter of adorable puppies and wants to give you one? What then?

“Someone who acquires an animal for free should plan on spay/neuter expenses, in addition to hundreds of dollars and sometimes more yearly, depending on the animal’s size and needs. And, you’ve got to factor in that, just like humans, your little dog or kitty’s needs will increase as she grows older, often leading to significant health issues and expensive veterinary costs.”

As Fido or Kitty become family members, they can also benefit from pet insurance which Bell explained.

“Just like car insurance, pet insurance has an annual premium and a deductible which the pet owner pays before the insurance kicks in. We pay $50 a month for our geriatric cat’s policy, and that rate has increased over time.

“Clearly, a 1-year-old dog will have a smaller premium than one 14 years old. As the older dog requires more health care, the likelihood of having to reimburse for higher veterinary charges will increase as well,” Bell underscores.

Unlike human health insurance, “Pet insurance reimburses you. So if your dog eats a sock which wraps around his intestines requiring emergency surgery, you will have to pay $3,500 — and your insurance will reimburse you a certain portion of that.”

Budget for your pet’s life

As veterinarians are under no legal obligation to provide free services, “a financial burden rests on the shoulders of the animal guardian, lessened by creating a budget for this life that depends on you, and being prepared for an emergency.”

So, as you can see, showing up at a vet clinic you’ve never dealt with — holding a dying animal and expecting free care — is unreasonable. Also, Bell notes that crisis situations frequently result “because initial symptoms were ignored.”

To PETA’s Stephanie Bell, the moral of today’s story is clear:

“Veterinary care is a necessary and predictable expense that comes with the responsibility of animal guardianship.”

Dennis Beaver practices law in Bakersfield and welcomes comments and questions from readers, which may be faxed to 661-323-7993, or emailed to Lagombeaver1@gmail.com. Also, visit dennisbeaver.com.

‘We’ve just adopted a rescue dog with health problems – should we get pet insurance?’

Question: We have just adopted a rescue dog who has a few minor health problems.

When I brought her for her first check-up to the vet, he asked me if I was planning on taking out pet insurance. He showed me a list of some of the fees I would have to pay if the dog needed an operation in the future. We would not be in a position to afford them. Given that the dog already has a few health issues, should I take out pet insurance? Laura, Shillelagh, Co Wicklow

Answer: Pet insurance can help cover the cost of your pet’s medical treatment if she is sick or seriously injured. It can help to pay for large, unexpected or unplanned expenses – but not more routine treatment. However, having pet insurance can mean you won’t have to make a difficult decision if you can’t afford your dog’s medical treatment.

Before you decide to take out a policy, it is important to get the right cover for your pet. Most policies cover vet fees for illness or injury, care for your pet if you are in hospital, and rewards for lost or stolen pets. Insurers won’t cover any pre-existing conditions your pet may have. On most policies, routine treatments such as vaccinations and neutering won’t be covered. Flea and worm control and anything related to pregnancy or birth are also excluded. Also, watch out for things like after-hours emergency care which can be very expensive and may not be included in a standard policy.

Another thing to think about is how much pet insurance cover you should get. For instance, you may be unsure whether to get “accident only” cover, which covers accidental injuries such as your pet getting hit by a car, or “lifetime cover”, which covers your pet for an illness and/or injury which requires treatment for several years over your pet’s lifetime.

Make sure you get the best deal on your pet insurance by getting quotes from a number of insurers online or over the phone. Write down all the details as you go along, so that you can clearly compare what’s on offer. Also be aware that you may pay a little extra if you choose to pay monthly by direct debit – instead of paying the yearly fee, as with other types of insurance.

More than just medical: Credit unions get creative with benefits offerings

Major medical, dental and vision insurance coverage are one thing, but that only scratches the surface of the benefits that many credit unions make available to their employees.

Beyond just the standard offerings, some credit unions provide their workers – and occasionally their members – with a slew of unusual and eccentric perks, part of a larger shift among employers as they recognize the need to constantly tweak benefits offerings.

One example of that is TruChoice Federal Credit Union, a $119 million institution based in South Portland, Maine, which celebrates the unusually named “Farkle Friday” as part of its “TruSpirit” program.

“On Fridays, staff may donate $1 to wear jeans, the donations go to support causes that are near to our hearts,” Human Resources Manager Theresa Mercier told Credit Union Journal. “Staff have logo-wear, which we call ‘TruThreads’ – these are in our brand colors.”

TruChoice FCU employees wearing their TruThreads as part of the credit union's TruSpirit program.

TruChoice FCU employees wearing their TruThreads as part of the credit union’s TruSpirit program.

But what does “Farkle” mean? According to Mercier, it all ties back to a set of TruChoice-branded dice the credit union created and the credit union’s internal currency that staff can trade in for prizes and gift cards.

“On Friday morning we roll the dice and call ‘Farkle!’” she explained. “If the color you are wearing matches one of the die, you will receive one Ken Kash; if the color you are wearing matches both dice, you will receive five Ken Kash.”

Farkle dice at TruChoice FCU

Farkle dice used as part of the “Farkle Fridays” program at TruChoice FCU.

CUs go to the dogs (and cats)
At Bethpage Federal Credit Union, a $7.6 billion institution based in Bethpage, N.Y., healthy living is incentivized. As part of a push to encourage good dietary habits, health and exercise, the credit union a weight-loss reimbursement program, under which Bethpage will subsidize a weight-loss program for a maximum of $60 per quarter ($240 annually). This is available to both full and part-time employees after they complete six months of service at Bethpage.

The credit union also offers its “Pet Discount Care Program” which covers veterinary care, pet care services and products for full-time employees – and Bethpage is one of many CUs to put policies in place that treat furry members of the family like, well, family.

For example, Redwood Credit Union, a $3.5 billion institution based in Santa Rosa, Calif., also offers pet insurance products to its members. Under the program, offered through its wholly owned subsidiary, RCU Insurance Services, pet owners are given assistance in paying for their animals’ medical bills through a pet health insurance plan. The plan covers everything from regular exams to treatment for injuries and illness

Bay Federal Credit Union, a $908 million institution based in Capitola, Calif., also offers its employees group-discounted pet insurance as a benefit through Trupanion Pet Insurance (a separate insurance company that specializes in pet insurance).

Amy M. Ivey, VP of marketing and development at Bay FCU, said the credit union will contribute $5 per pet, up to a total of $10 per employee. “The remainder premium receives an 11 percent discounted rate, and are paid through payroll deduction,” she said.

Bay FCU employees

Bay FCU employees gather donations of food, blankets, toys, treats, and cash for the Santa Cruz County Animal Shelter

Employees can adjust their deductible amount which allows them to customize their monthly premium to fit their budget, Ivey added. Trupanion, she noted, is available for dogs and cats between the ages of eight weeks and 14 years. “We consider all employees and their loved ones part of our Bay Federal family,” Ivey added.

Meanwhile, Verve, a Credit Union, an $840 million institution based in Oshkosh, Wis., not only welcomes dogs into its branches, but even offers licensed therapy dog visits – and the members love it as much as the staff.

On Verve’s Facebook page, a member named Kevin Petersen wrote: “Verve is awesome. I’ve even been able to take our dog into their different locations.” In response, the credit union wrote back “You sure can still bring your dog into our branches. We actually have a therapy dog that visits our [Universal Street, Oshkosh] location once a week or so.”

Another member, Eugene Reeser, declared: “We bring our dog in regularly and when she had to have surgery – we received a get well card that everyone signed. Some even know her by name.”

Five Heroic Dogs Honored With AKC® Humane Fund Awards For Canine Excellence (ACE)

NEW YORK, Sept. 25, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The AKC® Humane Fund is pleased to announce the winners of the 18th annual AKCHumane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence (ACE). These awards celebrate five loyal, hard-working dogs that have significantly improved the lives of their owners and communities.

One award is presented in each of the following five categories: Uniformed Service K-9, Service, Therapy, Search and Rescue and Exemplary Companion dog. This year’s winners range from a retired show dog that helps children learn to read to a family pet turned narcotics detection K-9.

“The extraordinary stories of these five heroic ACE Award winners illustrate the devotion, loyalty and unconditional love that dogs give us,” said AKC Spokesperson Gina DiNardo. “Each of these dogs has changed the life of a person or a whole community and they all deserve to be celebrated. The ACE Awards give us an opportunity to pay tribute to these valiant canine companions.”

All of the ACE recipients will receive $1,000 to be awarded to a pet-related charity of their choice, a one-year pet insurance policy from AKC Pet Insurance, and an engraved sterling silver medallion will be presented to each at the AKC National Championship presented by Royal Canin in Orlando, Florida held on Saturday and Sunday, December 16-17, 2017.

This year’s ACE winners are:

Uniformed Service K-9: “Duke,” a Doberman Pinscher handled by Detective Sergeant Ed Soares of Menlo Park, California
“K-9 Duke” is a two-year-old Doberman Pinscher serving San Mateo County, California. He is certified by Police Officer Standards & Training (P.O.S.T) & California Narcotic Canine Association (CNCA). At eight weeks old, Duke was purchased by Detective Sergeant Ed Soares as a personal canine companion. After accompanying Sgt. Soares to a meeting at six-months-old, Duke was quickly enrolled in intensive training to become certified in narcotics detection. Duke has since been incorporated into the Menlo Park Police Special Investigation Unit, deployed during traffic enforcement stops, parole and probation searches, and narcotics cases all throughout the county. Duke also assists other agencies in narcotic investigations and is credited with finding tens of thousands of dollars in illegal narcotics and firearms during his career.

When Duke is not paroling the streets of San Mateo, he acts as an ambassador for his breed. He attends educational functions at schools, community events and hospitals where he meets and greets children and the citizens he and his team serve. According to Detective Sgt. Soares, Duke is his best self when he is around children. In 2016, the Doberman Pinscher Club of America board and officers named Duke the club’s honorary mascot.

Service Dog: “Gunner,” a Great Pyrenees owned by D. Hamilton Kinard of Richmond Hill, Georgia
“Gunner” is a three-year-old Great Pyrenees certified as a mobility assistance and PTSD service dog. After serving most of his adult life in the US Army, D. Hamilton Kinard medically retired in 2010. Kinard was paired with Gunner in 2013 after Hamilton was considered 100% disabled with total body nerve damage, a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and severe post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Gunner braces Kinard so he can stand and even pulls his wheelchair on his bad days. The Great Pyrenees’ kisses return Kinard to reality when he suffers from chronic flashbacks.

In 2014, Gunner inspired Britnee Kinard to found the SD Gunner Fund, a nonprofit organization providing disabled veterans and children with the financial means to obtain and maintain service dogs. Gunner also became the first mobility assistance TBI Service Dog to be approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs in the Southeast Georgia Coastal Region. In 2015, Gunner was honored along with the Kinard family as a Lincoln Award winner in Washington, D.C., at the Kennedy Center. Later that year, Gunner and the Kinard family were presented with the Distinguished Alumni Award for Community Service at Middle Tennessee State University for their continued dedication to helping others and spreading service dog awareness. Gunner visits schools, military installations, state and federal government entities, and universities all over the United States to raise awareness.

Therapy Dog: “Dennis,” a Skye Terrier owned by Stephen P. Hersey of Hampton, New Hampshire
“Dennis,” officially known as CH Seamist Big Man In Town CD BN RAE THDA, was an eleven-year-old Skye Terrier bred and owned by Stephen P. Hersey. Certified by Therapy Dog International, Dennis has left nothing short of a legacy behind.

Over the past seven years, Steve Hersey and Dennis had spent countless hours working in several areas of therapy work. Dennis visited a special autistic friend on Thursdays for the past six years and helped him build confidence and independence. He also participated in a Therapy Dog International reading program called “Tail Waggin Tutors” which allows children to read to dogs to help improve literacy skills. Illustrative of Dennis’ impact is a beautiful and moving letter from a parent of two boys in the program describing how her sons have grown into “reading machines” thanks to Dennis. She stated that her sons’ love for dogs has grown as well.

Unfortunately, Dennis passed away earlier this year after a life of helping others. Dennis’ work as a therapy dog has impacted many hearts and will always be remembered. His daughter, Evie, will accept the ACE Award on his behalf. Following in Dennis’ pawprints, Evie is currently training to become certified as a Therapy dog as well.

Search and Rescue Dog: “Piglet,” a Catahoula Leopard Dog owned and handled by Lori Wells of Lancaster, California
“Piglet,” a six-year-old Catahoula Leopard Dog, is rigorously trained and certified to find human remains on land and in water. Each year Piglet and handler, Lori Wells spend hundreds of hours training, testing, and answering the call of duty for law enforcement agencies in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Utah. At nearly 7 years old, Piglet has built a reputation as an unparalleled search resource.

Her case file is thick with an extensive list of grieving families who were granted some closure because of the grueling searches performed by Piglet and Wells. In one case, searchers had spent a week scouring a lake for a drowning victim to no avail. On day eight of the search, Piglet deployed and successfully recovered the person. In another case, she deployed in a remote wilderness area to assist in a search and Piglet was able to locate the subject’s remains. Her diligence and tenacity in this discovery provided a wife and nine children the answers they needed to move forward. Piglet is unique not only for her diligent work ethic and talented nose, but also for her infectious ‘smile’. She always lights up the room at community events and fundraisers and is happy to make new friends, human and canine alike.

Exemplary Companion Dog: “Amber,” a Cardigan Welsh Corgi owned by Sonja Benavidez of Geneseo, Illinois
“Amber,” a two-year-old Cardigan Welsh Corgi, owned by Sonja Benavidez of Geneseo, Illinois, helped Sonja regain her happiness after a life filled with much pain and agony. After surviving Encephalitis in the early 1960’s, Sonja has overcome a coma, paralysis below the waist, braces and many surgeries, none of which stopped her from doing what she loved most – showing Cardigan Welsh Corgis. In 2013, a series of foot injuries had bound Sonja to a wheelchair which diminished her independence and motivation.

Sonja received Amber about a year later, after helping a friend with a litter. Just two-years-old at the time of her nomination, Amber is a Grand Champion. She placed in conformation, obedience, and rally at the 2016 Cardigan national specialty, and was Novice A High in Trial at the 2017 national. Additionally, Amber has earned a Canine Good Citizen Advanced title, is a certified therapy dog, and has met the requirements for the Cardigan club’s versatility award. 

Amber and Sonja have been told that they are the best wheelchair dog-and-handler team ever seen in the show ring. Amber helped re-light the flame in Sonja’s heart and this dynamic team continues to inspire other disabled people to get in the ring.

Read more about all of the ACE Award winners here.

Click here to view and download imagery of the 2017 AKC Humane Fund ACE recipients.

The AKC Humane Fund, Inc. unites animal lovers in promoting the joy and value of responsible pet ownership through education, outreach and grant-making. The Fund provides financial grants to domestic violence shelters and Breed Rescue organizations and awards scholarships to students pursuing professions that strengthen the human-animal bond. The AKC Humane Fund’s Awards for Canine Excellence are given each year to promote the important role dogs play in our lives. Contributions to the AKC Humane Fund are fully tax deductible as allowed by law under Section 501(c)(3) of the IRS Code. For more information, visit www.akchumanefund.org.

The American Kennel Club
Founded in 1884, the American Kennel Club is a not-for-profit organization which maintains the largest registry of purebred dogs in the world and oversees the sport of purebred dogs in the United States. The AKC is dedicated to upholding the integrity of its registry, promoting the sport of purebred dogs and breeding for type and function.  Along with its more than 5,000 licensed and member clubs and its affiliated organizations, the AKC advocates for the purebred dog as a family companion, advances canine health and well-being, works to protect the rights of all dog owners and promotes responsible dog ownership. More than 22,000 competitions for AKC-registered purebred dogs are held under AKC rules and regulations each year including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, tracking, herding, lure coursing, coonhound events, hunt tests, field and earthdog tests. Affiliate AKC organizations include the AKC Humane Fund, AKC Canine Health Foundation, AKC Reunite and the AKC Museum of the Dog.  For more information, visit www.akc.org.

AKC, American Kennel Club, the American Kennel Club seal and design, and all associated marks and logos are trademarks, registered trademarks and service marks of The American Kennel Club, Inc.

Become a fan of the American Kennel Club on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter @AKCDogLovers.

Royal Canin USA
Royal Canin USA is a leader in science-based cat and dog health nutrition. Founded by a veterinarian in 1968, Royal Canin has more than 40 years of experience in delivering individualized nutritional solutions. In collaboration with an expert team of nutritionists, breeders and veterinarians from around the world, Royal Canin places cats and dogs at the central point of the innovation process. The Royal Canin product line offers a range of diets based on size, age, breed, lifestyle and therapeutic requirements. Royal Canin diets are available at veterinary hospitals and pet specialty stores nationwide. Royal Canin is a subsidiary of Mars, Incorporated. To learn more about Royal Canin, visit www.royalcanin.com and “LIKE” us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/royalcaninus.

 

 

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SOURCE AKC Humane Fund

5 Heroic Dogs Honored with AKC Humane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence

The AKC Humane Fund announced the winners of the 18th annual AKC Humane Fund Awards for Canine Excellence (ACE). These awards celebrate five loyal, hard-working dogs that have significantly improved the lives of their owners and communities.

One award is presented in each of the following five categories: Uniformed Service K-9, Service, Therapy, Search and Rescue and Exemplary Companion dog. This year’s winners range from a retired show dog that helps children learn to read to a family pet turned narcotics detection K-9.

“The extraordinary stories of these five heroic ACE Award winners illustrate the devotion, loyalty and unconditional love that dogs give us,” AKC spokesperson Gina DiNardo said. “Each of these dogs has changed the life of a person or a whole community and they all deserve to be celebrated. The ACE Awards give us an opportunity to pay tribute to these valiant canine companions.”

All of the ACE recipients will receive $1,000 to be awarded to a pet-related charity of their choice, a one-year pet insurance policy from AKC Pet Insurance and an engraved sterling silver medallion will be presented to each at the AKC National Championship presented by Royal Canin in Orlando, Florida, held on Saturday and Sunday, December 16-17, 2017.

This year’s ACE winners are:

Uniformed Service K-9: “Duke,” a Doberman Pinscher handled by Detective Sergeant Ed Soares of Menlo Park, CaliforniaUniformed Services Duke3

“K-9 Duke” is a 2-year-old Doberman Pinscher serving San Mateo County, California. He is certified by Police Officer Standards & Training (P.O.S.T) & California Narcotic Canine Association (CNCA). At 8 weeks old, Duke was purchased by Detective Sergeant Ed Soares as a personal canine companion. After accompanying Sgt. Soares to a meeting at 6 months old, Duke was quickly enrolled in intensive training to become certified in narcotics detection. Duke has since been incorporated into the Menlo Park Police Special Investigation Unit, deployed during traffic enforcement stops, parole and probation searches, and narcotics cases all throughout the county. Duke also assists other agencies in narcotic investigations and is credited with finding tens of thousands of dollars in illegal narcotics and firearms during his career.

When Duke is not paroling the streets of San Mateo, he acts as an ambassador for his breed. He attends educational functions at schools, community events and hospitals where he meets and greets children and the citizens he and his team serve. According to Detective Sgt. Soares, Duke is his best self when he is around children. In 2016, the Doberman Pinscher Club of America board and officers named Duke the club’s honorary mascot.

Service Dog Gunner Great Pyrenees2Service Dog: “Gunner,” a Great Pyrenees owned by D. Hamilton Kinard of Richmond Hill, Georgia

“Gunner” is a 3-year-old Great Pyrenees certified as a mobility assistance and PTSD service dog. After serving most of his adult life in the U.S. Army, D. Hamilton Kinard medically retired in 2010. Kinard was paired with Gunner in 2013 after Hamilton was considered 100 percent disabled with total body nerve damage, a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and severe post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Gunner braces Kinard so he can stand and even pulls his wheelchair on his bad days. The Great Pyrenees’ kisses return Kinard to reality when he suffers from chronic flashbacks.

In 2014, Gunner inspired Britnee Kinard to found the SD Gunner Fund, a nonprofit organization providing disabled veterans and children with the financial means to obtain and maintain service dogs. Gunner also became the first mobility assistance TBI Service Dog to be approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs in the Southeast Georgia Coastal Region. In 2015, Gunner was honored along with the Kinard family as a Lincoln Award winner in Washington, D.C., at the Kennedy Center. Later that year, Gunner and the Kinard family were presented with the Distinguished Alumni Award for Community Service at Middle Tennessee State University for their continued dedication to helping others and spreading service dog awareness. Gunner visits schools, military installations, state and federal government entities, and universities all over the United States to raise awareness.

Therapy Dog Dennis9Therapy Dog: “Dennis,” a Skye Terrier owned by Stephen P. Hersey of Hampton, New Hampshire

“Dennis,” officially known as CH Seamist Big Man In Town CD BN RAE THDA, was an 11-year-old skye terrier bred and owned by Stephen P. Hersey. Certified by Therapy Dog International, Dennis has left nothing short of a legacy behind.

Over the past seven years, Hersey and Dennis had spent countless hours working in several areas of therapy work. Dennis visited a special autistic friend on Thursdays for the past six years and helped him build confidence and independence. He also participated in a Therapy Dog International reading program called “Tail Waggin Tutors” which allows children to read to dogs to help improve literacy skills. Illustrative of Dennis’ impact is a beautiful and moving letter from a parent of two boys in the program describing how her sons have grown into “reading machines” thanks to Dennis. She stated that her sons’ love for dogs has grown as well.

Unfortunately, Dennis passed away earlier this year after a life of helping others. Dennis’ work as a therapy dog has impacted many hearts and will always be remembered. His daughter, Evie, will accept the ACE Award on his behalf. Following in Dennis’ pawprints, Evie is currently training to become certified as a Therapy dog as well.

Search and Rescue Piglet2Search and Rescue Dog: “Piglet,” a Catahoula Leopard Dog owned and handled by Lori Wells of Lancaster, California

“Piglet,” a 6-year-old Catahoula Leopard Dog, is rigorously trained and certified to find human remains on land and in water. Each year, Piglet and handler Lori Wells spend hundreds of hours training, testing and answering the call of duty for law enforcement agencies in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Utah. At nearly 7 years old, Piglet has built a reputation as an unparalleled search resource.

Her case file is thick with an extensive list of grieving families who were granted some closure because of the grueling searches performed by Piglet and Wells. In one case, searchers had spent a week scouring a lake for a drowning victim to no avail. On day eight of the search, Piglet deployed and successfully recovered the person. In another case, she deployed in a remote wilderness area to assist in a search, and Piglet was able to locate the subject’s remains. Her diligence and tenacity in this discovery provided a wife and nine children the answers they needed to move forward. Piglet is unique not only for her diligent work ethic and talented nose, but also for her infectious ‘smile.’ She always lights up the room at community events and fundraisers and is happy to make new friends, human and canine alike.

Exemplary Companion Dog: “Amber,” a Cardigan Welsh Corgi owned by Sonja Benavidez of Geneseo, Illinois

“Amber,” a 2-year-old Cardigan Welsh Corgi, owned by Sonja Benavidez of Geneseo, Illinois, helped Benavidez regain her happiness after aAmber18 life filled with much pain and agony. After surviving Encephalitis in the early 1960s, Benavidez has overcome a coma, paralysis below the waist, braces and many surgeries, none of which stopped her from doing what she loved most: showing Cardigan Welsh Corgis. In 2013, a series of foot injuries had bound Sonja to a wheelchair which diminished her independence and motivation.

Sonja received Amber about a year later, after helping a friend with a litter. Just 2 years old at the time of her nomination, Amber is a Grand Champion. She placed in conformation, obedience, and rally at the 2016 Cardigan national specialty, and was Novice A High in Trial at the 2017 national. Additionally, Amber has earned a Canine Good Citizen Advanced title, is a certified therapy dog, and has met the requirements for the Cardigan club’s versatility award.

Amber and Benavidez have been told that they are the best wheelchair dog-and-handler team ever seen in the show ring. Amber helped re-light the flame in Benavidez’s heart, and this dynamic team continues to inspire other disabled people to get in the ring.

Read more about all of the ACE Award winners here.

How To Take Care Of Cats | 10 Pet Insurance Facts to Know Before You Buy a Policy


How To Take Care Of Cats | 10 Pet Insurance Facts to Know Before You Buy a Policy

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Take me home: Valley Animal Haven | Local

Take me home: Valley Animal Haven | Local | hanfordsentinel.com



You are the owner of this article.



Take me home Munch

Munch is a two-year-old Pekingese mix. He gets along with other dogs and has fun playing with his kennel pals. He would like a family of his own that will love him. $175 adoption fee includes; spay/neuter, vaccinations, deworming, micro chip and free 30-minute training class with a local certified trainer. You will also receive a free Pet Pack from Petsmart and optional 30-days pet insurance. Spend time in the play-yard with him and make a friend.


VAH

Fundraiser update

Valley Animal Haven would like to extend a hearty thank you to the public that attended the fundraising yard sale on Sept. 16-17. The event yielded over $3000 in donations for the ongoing upkeep and health of the animals.

Black Friday Special

First Friday of each month through 2017, any predominantly black dog or cat, 7-months or older, can be adopted for the special price of $145 for dogs, fee includes spay/neuter, microchip, vaccinations, de-worming, 30-days pet insurance and 30-minute training session with a local trainer. Cats are $70.

Hours of operation Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Valley Animal Haven, 990 E. D St., Lemoore. Visit our website at www.valleyanimalhaven.org, call 997-3601, or find us on Facebook.

Now through the end of the month enjoy free, unlimited digital access on our website.

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Nationwide® to Honor Most Unusual Pet Insurance Claim of the Year

BREA, Calif., Sept. 21, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — After reviewing nearly 1.5 million pet insurance claims received over the past year, Nationwide has nominated 12 worthy candidates for the 2017 Hambone Award. Each year, the nation’s first and largest provider of pet health insurance searches through its database of more than 600,000 insured pets to honor the most “Unusual Pet Insurance Claim of the Year.” The winner will be decided by a public vote Sept. 21Oct. 4 at www.HamboneAward.com.

In addition, the veterinary practice that treated this year’s Hambone Award winner will receive a $10,000 Nationwide-funded award through the Veterinary Care Foundation to treat pets whose owners could not otherwise afford treatment.

From the dog who was impaled by a tree branch to the cat who fell down an abandoned well, each of the 12 nominees have uniquely harrowing tales. All nominated pets have made full recoveries and received Nationwide insurance reimbursements for eligible veterinary expenses. Below are brief summaries of the 12 unusual claims nominated for the 2017 Hambone Award. For a more detailed account of each story, photos of the nominees, or to vote (Sept. 21Oct. 4), visit www.HamboneAward.com.

Hambone Award Nominees:

  • Muffy the tabby cat (Sylmar, California). Muffy the diabetic cat has a strict feeding schedule, and after he missed a routine meal his owners became worried. Little did they know, Muffy had fallen down an abandoned well and wouldn’t be saved without a heroic effort from the whole family.
  • Star the cattle dog mix (South Bend, Indiana). Star’s daily walks are often interrupted by her clumsiness, but a recent trailside blunder nearly ended in tragedy after she fell into a hidden manhole.
  • Rooster the hound mix (Scranton, Pennsylvania). After a horrific incident at work, Rooster became his owner’s source of comfort and therapy, but that companionship was nearly lost after Rooster was impaled by a tree branch during a hike.
  • Ruger the border collie/Labrador retriever mix (Fairfield, California). Ruger was nearly killed after being run over and pinned underneath a large golf cart. Ruger was trapped under the cart until being saved by a group of local firefighters.
  • Raja the golden retriever (Naperville, Illinois). Raja nearly lost his life after being trapped in a house fire, but was saved by a daring rescue from his owner.
  • Butterscotch the great Pyrenees/Irish setter mix (Minneapolis, Minnesota). A walk in the city left Butterscotch with shocking injuries after he stepped in a puddle that was exposed to a live wire and was electrocuted.
  • Ruby the golden retriever (Lakewood, Washington). Ruby’s puppy mischief nearly turned tragic after she got her head stuck in a moving elevator door, which smashed her snout.
  • Chuter the Labrador retriever/Irish Setter mix (Fairbanks, Alaska). A backyard bathroom break nearly ended in tragedy when Chuter was attacked by a massive mother moose, sustaining lifethreatening injuries.
  • Levi the Labrador retriever (Huntington Beach, California). Levi’s anxiety over the loss of a fellow family dog caused him to start chewing items around the house, and despite his family’s efforts, Levi’s bad habit peaked when he swallowed a pair of adult pajama pants.
  • King the bullmastiff (Lake Charles, Louisiana). King let his sweet tooth get the best of him when he snatched a frosting covered spatula off the kitchen counter and swallowed it whole. Little did he know, the utensil would nearly take his life and lead to the removal of a portion of his intestines.
  • Denali the husky mix (Treasure Island, Florida). Denali almost lost her life after she snuck out of her yard and jumped into to a local pond where she was attacked by a huge alligator. Denali miraculously escaped by fighting off the 7-foot alligator and swimming to shore.
  • Tessa the mixed breed dog (North Kingstown, Rhode Island). Tessa was only trying to protect her family when she charged a running chainsaw, but the incident nearly left her with amputations after she sustained deep lacerations on her legs.

Originally named after a dog who ate an entire Thanksgiving ham while stuck in a refrigerator, the annual Hambone Award has since been given to the most bizarre medical claim each year since 2009. Past winners include: Kismet, a Jack Russell terrier who sustained major stab wounds while fighting off a home intruder; Curtis, a boxer who swallowed a barbeque skewer that disappeared in his body and nearly ended his life a year later; Charlie, a Labrador retriever who became entangled with a tractor; Ellie, a Labrador retriever who gobbled up an entire beehive and its thousands of inhabitants; Lulu, a hungry bulldog who swallowed 15 baby pacifiers, a bottle cap and a piece of a basketball; Harley, a pug who ate and subsequently passed more than 100 rocks; Peanut, a dachshund-terrier mix who survived a fierce squabble with a skunk; and Winnie, a mixed-breed dog who swallowed two pounds of uncooked onion rings.

“Our annual Hambone Award is a great reminder that pet injuries are unpredictable and often come at the most inopportune times,” said Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president and chief veterinary officer for Nationwide. “The stories of our nominees not only bring to light the unusual ways that our pets can be injured, but also showcase the amazing advances in veterinary care. These pets all made remarkable recoveries because of the diligence of their owners and the incredible skills of their treating veterinarians.”

About Nationwide pet insurance
With more than 600,000 insured pets, pet insurance from Nationwide is the first and largest pet health insurance provider in the United States. Since 1982, Nationwide has helped provide pet owners with peace of mind and is committed to being the trusted choice of America’s pet lovers.

Nationwide plans cover dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets for multiple medical problems and conditions relating to accidents, illnesses and injuries. Medical plans are available in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Insurance plans are offered and administered by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company in California and DVM Insurance Agency in all other states. Underwritten by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company (CA), Brea, CA, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2016); National Casualty Company (all other states), Columbus, OH, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2016). Pet owners can find Nationwide pet insurance on Facebook or follow on Twitter. For more information about Nationwide pet insurance, call 800-USA-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com.

About Nationwide
Nationwide, a Fortune 100 company based in Columbus, Ohio, is one of the largest and strongest diversified insurance and financial services organizations in the U.S. and is rated A+ by both A.M. Best and Standard & Poor’s. The company provides a full range of insurance and financial services, including auto, commercial, homeowners, farm and life insurance; public and private sector retirement plans, annuities and mutual funds; banking and mortgages; excess & surplus, specialty and surety; pet, motorcycle and boat insurance. For more information, visit www.nationwide.com.

Nationwide and the Nationwide N and Eagle are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. ©2017 Nationwide.

CONTACT:
Media Relations
(714) 706-5652
rel=”nofollow”>mediainfo@petinsurance.com

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nationwide-to-honor-most-unusual-pet-insurance-claim-of-the-year-300522804.html

SOURCE Nationwide

Why Pet Insurance Is A Must


Hello everyone. We recently went through a troublesome ordeal with our dog Kai and this is just a PSA on pet insurance and how it really helped alleviate stress in an already stressful situation. Below, you will find some information about our policy.

Issuer: Nationwide
Cost: $140/Month for 3 dogs
Covers: 100% reimbursement*
Deductible: $250 Annually per dog

*Does not include preexisting conditions or preventative care.

Instagram: @Ferns_Francois
Snapchat: Fernandoinferno
Kai’s Instagram: AkiKaiChloe

Travel Blog:

Market Dynamics and Opportunities 2017

Summary

United Kingdom pet insurance market has continued to see significant growth, with gross written premiums (GWP) increasing by 7.1% in 2016. Medical inflation remains the underlying factor driving GWP upwards, with technologically improved quality of treatments and procedures being applied more commonly and driving inflationary pressure on claims costs. This has resulted in claims incurred figures outgrowing GWP, with a 7.4% increase in 2016.

Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4012193

Product penetration has also risen, but at a considerably slower rate than GWP or claims incurred, with the number of subscribers increasing by just 2.0%, to reach 3.4 million in 2016.

Key findings include in this report –

– The pet insurance market broke the £1bn mark in GWP for the first time in 2016 as insurers continue to battle rising medical costs.

– Having previously been under-represented on price comparison sites, many pet providers now see them as a crucial distribution channel.

– Available data with regards to the UK pet population and pet ownership suggests dogs still lead the way over cats.

– Insurtech is entering the market with Fitbit-style technology, a range of apps, and innovative comparison sites beginning to emerge.

Pet insurance market continued on an upward trend with regards to market size in 2016. Strong growth in GWP was seen yet again, but the market remains blighted by significant increases in the number of reported claims, which grew to record levels. The ongoing growth in GWP has been driven by the response to a tough claims environment with rising prices, as insurers look to improve returns and generate better business. The greatest issue facing this market is that insurers cannot continue raising premiums by almost 10% every year without driving customers away.

Market leader Petplan still avoids comparison sites, but has a window to them through its subsidiary, Sainsbury’s Pet Insurance. Aggregators are essential for smaller companies, both to foster brand awareness and because being absent from them can be viewed as suspicious by consumers.

The report “UK Pet Insurance: Market Dynamics and Opportunities 2017” analyzes the UK pet insurance market, looking at market size as well as changes in premiums, claims, medical costs, pet ownership, regulations, and opportunities. It discusses the leading competitors, how the market is likely to change due to rising costs and emerging technology, and provides future forecasts of market size up to 2021.

Companies mentioned in this report: RSA, Aviva, NFU Mutual, LV=, Allianz, Petplan, Bought By Many, Direct Line, E&L, BNP Paribas.

Scope

– The pet insurance market broke the £1bn mark in GWP for the first time in 2016 as insurers continue to battle rising medical costs.

– Having previously been under-represented on price comparison sites, many pet providers now see them as a crucial distribution channel.

– Insurtech is entering the market with Fitbit-style technology, a range of apps, and innovative comparison sites beginning to emerge.

Reasons to buy

– Keep up to date with the new trends and innovations in the market.

– Benchmark yourself against competitors.

– Learn about growth in all aspects of the market, what is driving it, and whether it looks set to continue.

Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4012193  

About Reportbuyer

Reportbuyer is a leading industry intelligence solution that provides all market research reports from top publishers

https://www.reportbuyer.com  

For more information:

Sarah Smith

Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com

Email: query@reportbuyer.com

Tel: +44 208 816 85 48

Website: www.reportbuyer.com

View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/uk-pet-insurance-market-dynamics-and-opportunities-2017-300524039.html

SOURCE ReportBuyer

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